Partners To End Homelessness: Our Mission

We often are asked what are mission is. The short answer is we desire to see homelessness brought to end in our community! But we cannot reach this ambitious goal alone. We are made up of several service organizations whose goal is to help homeless individuals and families. We are made up groups of people who stand up for those already homeless and those who are at risk at becoming homeless. Without these organizations of people whose hearts are filled with a desire to provide services, resources, and help to those who need it, our goal would fall short. We are so thankful for these people who have made it their mission to help others!

We are also asked what we do at PTEH. We have several functions! We develop and maintain a Continuum of Care for homeless services (as defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in the Hinds, Madison, Rankin, Warren, and Copiah county service area. We formalize working relationships among the agencies and others making up PTEH. We provide a strategy for setting and reaching the goals and objectives identified by the Continuum of Care. We work to find funding for projects that provide services, housing, and housing related services to the homeless and those at risk of becoming homeless. We also administer any grants received to achieve those goals.

If you are interested in becoming a member, let us know! As a service provider, homeless advocate, state or federal agency, your input is key to understanding the services currently provided in our community and where gaps exists. Join us for our monthly meetings, participate in committees, and become involved in the solution!

Act of Kindness Goes Viral

Recently, the image of a Chicago cop buying a homeless man a meal at Chiptole went viral on social media. A few times a month, we see stories like this one and it truly warms our hearts to see someone stepping out and helping someone in need. In a time where it seems our newsfeeds are constantly filled with one tragedy after another, it is a great change of pace to see a story where something good is happening; where a person is using his resources to help someone and simply showing kindness to a stranger in need.

We love to see people helping others in the news, but there are a lot of people that go unseen each day as they step out into their community to serve those in need. That is why we do what we do. It is our mission to help the homeless in our community. With the help of generous people, organizations, ministries, and businesses, we are on a mission to change this community. Can you help? You may not ever end up on the news, and a picture of you may never circle around various social media channels, but you will change someone’s life. You will give someone hope. We are not all equal in finances, skills, talents, or resources, but it takes people of all circumstances to change the world. And it starts where you are. Your community. We all have kindness to offer. Whether it be a meal to a hungry person, or a smile and encouraging word to a struggling family.

Together we can change our community. Together we can change the world.

If you would like to talk to someone at Partners to End Homelessness, give us a call at (601) 213-5301. We would be happy to talk with you and tell you more about what we are doing in the community.

How Does Homelessness Affect Children?

According to a report by the National Center on Family Homelessness, one in 30 American children are homeless. If that number sounds high to you, it is. It’s an all-time high for the United States, in fact. This in-depth report is about more than just statistics and numbers, it is an all too clear picture of what is happening to our youth—the epidemic of mental, physical, and spiritual harm they are experiencing on a daily basis.

America’s Youngest Outcasts” points out that 2.5 million American children experienced homelessness in 2013, which was an 8 percent increase from 2012. It is hard to imagine this many children in our country that are experiencing something as devastating as homelessness. Without help, these experiences can cause many problems that they may never recover from. But we know that children are resilient and with help, change, and recovery, these children can grow up and experience a normal life.

What can be done? The study shows these things are crucial for change:

• Safe affordable housing.

• Education and employment opportunities.

• Comprehensive needs assessments of all family members.

• Services that incorporate trauma-informed care.

• Attention to identification, prevention, and treatment of major depression in mothers.

• Parenting supports for mothers.

• Research to identify evidence-based programs and services


Excerpt: Research has continued to document the mental health needs of  homeless children. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis based on the literature to date summarized the mental health needs of homeless children. The authors found that 10% to 26% of homeless pre-school children had mental health problems requiring clinical evaluation. This increased to 24% to 40% among homeless school age children—two to four times the rate of poor children in a similar age range (Bassuk, Richard & Tsertsvadze, 2014 in review). In light of these findings, any solution to child homelessness must account for high levels of stress experienced by these children, and their frequent exposure to violence and its mental health consequences.

Children experiencing homelessness are among the most invisible and neglected individuals in our nation. Despite their ever-growing number, homeless children have no voice and no constituency. Without a bed to call their own, they have lost safety, privacy, and the comforts of home, as well as friends, pets, possessions, reassuring routines, and community. These losses combine to create a life-altering experience that inflicts profound and lasting scars. For over 25 years, The National Center on Family Homelessness has conducted research to document the reality of these children’s experiences with the hope that we can mobilize the political will to improve the lives of  these children. This report continues our commitment.


This report is truly eye-opening. If you want to know more about child homelessness, I highly recommend reading through this entire study found here. It’s 130 pages, but you will walk away with a clearer understanding of what is happening to the youth in our country.

If you would like more information about Partners to End Homelessness and what we are doing in our community, please give us a call at (601) 213-5301. We would love to speak with you!


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How to Talk to the Homeless

A common question we hear from people wanting to help the homeless is “How do I talk to the homeless? What do I say?”

First, let me commend you for stepping out of your comfort zone to help people in need. Our country is in need of more people who are willing to recognize the state of need in our nation and step up to help in any way they realistically can. 

Speak from the heart

There is no script to rely upon when you are speaking to someone, whether they are in need or not. You speak from your heart! Tell the truth. For instance, some people ignore the homeless on the street because they don’t have any money to give them. What if instead of shaking your head and walking by,  you told them the truth and asked their name so you could keep them in your thoughts and prayers. Maybe make a real plan to stop by at a different time to check in on them to see how they are doing. Have a conversation with them. Your words could give them joy in a place where joy is hard to find. 

Don’t assume what they need

We hear that a lot of people don’t want to give the homeless money and will bring them food instead. But don’t assume what the homeless need. It’s commonly thought of that all homeless are starving, but sometimes that isn’t true. Some of the homeless in our community and around the state get regular access to food through soup kitchens or food pantries. The best way to make sure someone in need gets something that they actually need is to simply ask them what you can do to help them today. Maybe they could actually use a new coat or pair shoes more than a breakfast sandwich at the local fast food joint. If you can’t accommodate their request right away, meet them later to follow through.

We are so happy that you are looking for ways to help the homeless. We suggest working with one of the organizations in our community. Give us a call at (601) 213-5301 and we can point you in the right direction!


Resource Highlight: Catholic Charities Jackson

Our resource highlight of the month is Catholic Charities of Jackson, Mississippi. Catholic Charities provides a variety of services to people in the Jackson area and throughout the State of Mississippi. Adoption & maternity, alcohol & drugs, children’s mental health, domestic violence, family ministry, health ministry, immigration, rape crisis, refugees, social ministry and homeless veterans are just some of the areas and issues that Catholic Charities can assist with.

If you need help in any of these areas, please give them a call or check out their website. We have provided a list of links for specific issues below.

+ Parish Based Ministries
+ Children’s Services
+ Adoption & Maternity Services
+ Refugee Services
+ Counseling Services
+ Alcohol & Drug Services
+ Domestic Violence Services
+ Rape Crisis
+ Health Ministry
+ Immigration
+ Disaster Preparedness
+ Parish Social Ministry
+ Family Ministry
+ Supportive Services for Veteran Families

Catholic Charities appreciates any monetary donations you can give towards their mission of helping and serving this community. You can even donate your old cars! Check it out here.

For more information about Partners to End Homelessness, feel free to give us a call at (601) 213-5301. We would love to speak with you about what we do here in the community.

Helping the Homeless With a Childlike Spirit

By now, most you have probably heard the story of the 5-year old, Josiah Duncan from Alabama, who made the news after he made sure a homeless man had a meal. This young boy noticed the homeless man not being waited on in their local Waffle House. Curious, he asked his mother about it and she explained that he was homeless and all that it meant.

With a compassionate spirit, Josiah asked his mother to buy the man a meal. After talking to the man and insisting that he order anything he wanted, including lots of bacon, he sang a blessing over him. Why did this go viral? Why did this story spread like wildfire through social media and on news outlets around the country? Because it’s a wonderful and truly inspiring event. It showed the actions of an innocent young child who couldn’t stand the idea of someone living without a home—someone going without a meal.

What if we all had this same spirit? What if everyone had the notion to reach out and help one person that lives without a home, or a person that has to skip meals, or a child who goes to school without school supplies. There are people all around us, in our communities, all around the country, who are struggling to survive. What can we do? How can we help?

When you look at the numbers and see how many people are homeless in America, it can seem like an overwhelming, impossible situation. But what young Josiah showed us is that just a small act can make a difference in someone’s life. He made sure that homeless man had a meal. But it wasn’t just a plate of food he received. He was given hope that day. We all are capable of that. Not all of us can donate money every month to an organization. But we can offer hope to someone that is dire need. Whether it be from encouraging words, a warm coat for the winter months, or a warm meal to help someone through the day. So as you continue through 2015, we ask that you contemplate how you can help someone that is in need—how you can give someone in a bleak situation a glimmer of hope, a guiding light.

If you have any questions, or if you would like to find out how you can help us in the fight against homelessness here in Jackson, Mississippi, give us a call at (601) 213-5301.